The Seemingly Impossible Challenge

Sometimes small tasks feel insurmountable.  Finish this essay, read 20 pages, prepare for this test.  As an adult, I know this feeling.  (Do I have to fold the laundry?)  Although these small tasks are incredibly doable, we can lack the motivation to tackle them.

Enter the Seemingly Impossible Challenge, something that seems so big, so daunting, so seemingly impossible that students think, Wait, what?  How can I ever do that?

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Teaching analytical writing: Getting students to care

In my teaching career, I’ve learned so much about teaching writing—but little of that knowledge came from an educational book. Most of what I’ve learned has been through hard-won experience, through assignments and techniques that bombed and then through tweaking and tweaking until I finally created something successful.

And so much of what I’ve learned about writing has boiled down to this:  students must care deeply about what they’re writing.

Caring deeply is relatively easy with a creative piece or poetry or memoir.  But with analytical writing, it’s harder.  When I started teaching analytical writing, I chose assignments that allowed students to use a highly-structured five-paragraph essay format with prompts like, “Write about three significant symbols in Lord of the Flies” or “Analyze the three most important film elements that the director uses in Of Mice and Men.”  Yes, these essays were well-organized, but students rarely cared deeply about them.
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